Friday, more flotsam experiments …

Friday, a week into having an independant studio to work in.

Being alone is turning out to be pretty damn inspiring. I’ve had a chance to get ideas down on paper and develop them gently through the day. It’s been one of those weeks that’s made me happy to be a craftsperson and reminds you why you scrimp, save and work dingy part time jobs to pay for the time to play with metal.

I got my bag of driftwood out of storage when I moved and went through my beachy photos. Looking back at my last trip to Wales and the drfitwood spoons I made then I realised again how great a combination wood and silver can be – so I’ve set out to make some more ‘found object’ pieces. Here’s an almost complete picture of one of the necklaces I made today, following a quick sketch:

Flotsam Salvage Necklace (in pieces)

Then I found, in amongst the stash of driftwood, a really nicely coloured section of wood so I went a little crazy and made some brooches too:

New Salvage pieces in progress

and another necklace. Then I dropped them all at the Assay Office on my way home. More pictures when I pick them u next week!

*Good Day*

The beachcombing silversmith …

Well, everyone has to get their materials from somewhere.

It just so happens that my latest range [flotsam] means that I have to scour the odd beach looking for the perfect component. Of course, with weather like today’s it’s no hardship at all!

I went driftwood hunting in Aberaeron, in West Wales, a town where I holidayed as a child. It’s great to think that the work I’m making now is somehow tied to the landscape that’s inspired me since I was small. 

I gathered quite a stack of wood that’ll become handles on spoons, pots and pouring vessels in time for a show at the end of May, at Bleneheim Palace.

Flotsam Spoons, packing, and the paperwork that entailed.

Flotsam Spoon Pair 2009

Flotsam Spoon Pair 2009 - Silver and drift wood with etched detail

Pft, I always forget how much paperwork is involved in packing, cataloguing and organising things. I’ve just delivered work for an exhibition (details of which are here.) The task seemed simple: put 20 pieces of jewellery and a few bits of silverware  in a box and walk it around the corner to the gallery.

Ha, as if I would allow  myself to make my life that easy. I had to make lists of things, fill in gallery forms, clean my silver, wrap, then spy imaginary finger prints on my pieces, un-wrap everything, re-clean it, re-wrap it (yes, I may be my own perfectionist curse) and finally, having got it all together I put in a set of gloves (in the forlorn hope that who ever unpacks it will not get fingerprints on it) and made myself deliver it.

After all the effort I was rather ticked when the woman at the Gallery just snagged the box out of my hand, said thanks and slid it behind the counter. She didn’t stop to appreciate the hours that went into the effective use of space inside the box, or the neat scotch-taping of the bubble wrap. Still, at least it’s gone. Re-packing a third time would have been excessive.